CONNECT WITH US!

  • AIR FORCE JUNIOR ROTC
     SOUTH CAROLINA 932
     

     
    Visit our comprehensive web page by clicking here. 
     
     
    air force seal
     
    "Developing the Best Air Force Leaders and Citizens
    of Character, Dedicated to Serving the Nation"

    James F. Byrnes High School, Duncan, South Carolina.
     

    PROGRAM OVERVIEW

     
    GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The goal of the Air Force Junior ROTC program is to help high school students become better citizens and leaders by instilling a sense of responsibility, character, and self-discipline. The program promotes community service, education excellence, teamwork, fitness, and personal development for success. An underlying thread in ROTC is patriotism and pride in the institutions and values that make this country strong.  By design, AFJROTC is not a recruiting tool for the U.S. Armed forces, nor is it a military prep program.  In fact, fewer than 2% of our cadets enter some form of military service -- our goal is to develop citizens of character.
     

    ROTC “PILLARS” Citizenship and leadership are the two major focuses in all we do. Our cadets are heavily into community service and beyond. They respond with open hearts and hard work when it comes to helping others. Leadership is reflected in every activity. The cadets learn the fundamentals of good “followership” first - then develop sound leadership principles that will help them succeed in any endeavor.

     

    BRIEF HISTORY OF AFJROTC Army ROTC has been around since 1911, but all the military services committed to the program in 1964 with Public Law 88-647, the ROTC Vitalization Act. The law provided for the establishment of JROTC programs in all public and private high schools. The Air Force had reached its ceiling of 690 units until General Colin Powell, then Secretary of State, saw JROTC cadets cleaning up the streets after the Los Angeles riots. He liked the community service he saw and so did the Congress of the United States. Our legislators approved an Air Force expansion to 945 units by 2008. Today, there are over 900 high schools with Air Force Junior ROTC, and over 120,000 students are enrolled in the program. District Five officials took advantage of the new opportunity and secured a contract for Byrnes High School in 1992.

     

    THE INSTRUCTOR TEAM Since the AFJROTC program was established, the Air Force has actively recruited the most highly qualified officers and non- commissioned officers to serve as instructors in America’s high schools. Applicants are screened and scored according to academic, leadership, management, communicative, and professional skills. Most officer instructors have at least Masters degrees, and most non-commissioned officers have earned Bachelor or Associate degrees. The highest officer rank is Colonel, and the highest enlisted rank is Chief Master Sergeant. By contract, salaries must be comparable to what the instructors earned while on active duty, and the Air Force shares that expense. All instructors are retired. Complete Air Force biographies for the Byrnes instructor team are located under “Staff Profiles”.
     
    STUDENT ENROLLMENT Registration for the Air Force Junior ROTC program is open to freshmen through senior classes. During the first year, students receive physical education credit. Additional courses result in elective credit. Cadets may take ROTC all four years if they desire. After the freshman year, selected cadets may be allowed to double-block. Juniors and seniors may be selected to enroll in the AFJROTC honors classes for additional quality points toward graduation.
     
    Contact:
     
    Phone:  864-949-2364
    Fax:  864-949-2347
     
    Col Rhea Dobson:  rhea.dobson@spart5.net
    Chief Master Sergeant Mark Ippolito:  mark.ippolito@spart5.net
    Senior Master Sergeant Glenn Sparkman:  glenn.sparkman@spart5.net
    Master Sergeant Russell Routon:  russell.routon@spart5.net 
     

CLOSE